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The bestselling author and psychologist whose books have topped 240,000 copies in print now addresses the trait of “high sensitivity” in children–and offers a breakthrough parenting guidebook for highly sensitive children and their caregivers.

With the publication of The Highly Sensitive Person, Elaine Aron became the first person to identify the inborn trait of “high sensitivity” and to show how it affects the lives of those who possess it. Up to 20 percent of the population is born highly sensitive, and now in The Highly Sensitive Child, Aron shifts her focus to highly sensitive children, who share the same characteristics as highly sensitive adults and thus face unique challenges as they grow up.

Rooted in Aron’s years of experience as a psychotherapist and her original research on child temperament, The Highly Sensitive Child shows how HSCs are born deeply reflective, sensitive to the subtle, and easily overwhelmed. These qualities can make for smart, conscientious, creative children, but with the wrong parenting or schooling, they can become unusually shy or timid, or begin acting out. Few parents and teachers understand where this behavior comes from–and as a result, HSCs are often mislabeled as overly inhibited, fearful, or “fussy,”or classified as “problem children” (and in some cases, misdiagnosed with disorders such as Attention Deficit Disorder). But raised with proper understanding and care, HSCs are no more prone to these problems than nonsensitive children and can grow up to be happy, healthy, well-adjusted adults.

In this pioneering work, parents will find helpful self-tests and case studies to help them understand their HSC, along with thorough advice on:
• The challenges of raising an highly sensitive child

• The four keys to successfully parenting an HSC

• How to soothe highly sensitive infants

• Helping sensitive children survive in a not-so-sensitive world

• Making school and friendships enjoyable


With chapters addressing the needs of specific age groups, from newborns through teens, The Highly Sensitive Child delivers warmhearted, timely information for parents, teachers, and the sensitive children in their lives.

From Publishers Weekly

As a highly sensitive person (HSP) herself and a psychotherapist, Aron is in a strong position to provide guidance to parents who are raising highly sensitive children (HSCs), and provides here a wealth of useful suggestions and case studies. The author, who has studied and written about what she calls "high sensitivity" (The Highly Sensitive Person), states that this is a personality trait that occurs in 15% to 20% of the population. Although HSCs tend to be "empathetic, smart, intuitive, careful and conscientious," they are also easily overstimulated and require informed parenting in order to prevent temper tantrums, stress illnesses and the avoidance of pleasurable group activities. Aron offers helpful advice that will assist both nonsensitive and highly sensitive parents through all stages of their child''s development from infancy to adolescence. For example, since HSCs have great difficulty with change, it is necessary to prepare them gently so that they do not feel powerless during transitions. According to the author, there are four basic strategies that will help an HSC to become a happy adult: parents should foster their child''s self-esteem, try to reduce the feelings of shame HSCs may develop because they are different, employ only mild positive discipline and learn how to talk positively to teachers and friends about their HSC so that interactions will be productive.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Inside Flap

The bestselling author and psychologist whose books have topped 240,000 copies in print now addresses the trait of “high sensitivity” in children–and offers a breakthrough parenting guidebook for highly sensitive children and their caregivers. With the publication of The Highly Sensitive Person, Elaine Aron became the first person to identify the inborn trait of “high sensitivity” and to show how it affects the lives of those who possess it. Up to 20 percent of the population is born highly sensitive, and now in The Highly Sensitive Child, Aron shifts her focus to highly sensitive children, who share the same characteristics as highly sensitive adults and thus face unique challenges as they grow up.

From the Back Cover

"The bestselling author and psychologist whose books have topped 240,000 copies in print now addresses the trait of "high sensitivity" in children-and offers a breakthrough parenting guidebook for highly sensitive children and their caregivers.
With the publication of "The Highly Sensitive Person, Elaine Aron became the first person to identify the inborn trait of "high sensitivity" and to show how it affects the lives of those who possess it. Up to 20 percent of the population is born highly sensitive, and now in "The Highly Sensitive Child, Aron shifts her focus to highly sensitive children, who share the same characteristics as highly sensitive adults and thus face unique challenges as they grow up.
Rooted in Aron''s years of experience as a psychotherapist and her original research on child temperament, "The Highly Sensitive Child shows how HSCs are born deeply reflective, sensitive to the subtle, and easily overwhelmed. These qualities can make for smart, conscientious, creative children, but with the wrong parenting or schooling, they can become unusually shy or timid, or begin acting out. Few parents and teachers understand where this behavior comes from-and as a result, HSCs are often mislabeled as overly inhibited, fearful, or "fussy,"or classified as "problem children" (and in some cases, misdiagnosed with disorders such as Attention Deficit Disorder). But raised with proper understanding and care, HSCs are no more prone to these problems than nonsensitive children and can grow up to be happy, healthy, well-adjusted adults.
In this pioneering work, parents will find helpful self-tests and case studies to help them understand their HSC, along with thorough adviceon:
- The challenges of raising an highly sensitive child
- The four keys to successfully parenting an HSC
- How to soothe highly sensitive infants
- Helping sensitive children survive in a not-so-sensitive world
- Making school and friendships enjoyable

With chapters addressing the needs of specific age groups, from newborns through teens," The Highly Sensitive Child delivers warmhearted, timely information for parents, teachers, and the sensitive children in their lives.

About the Author

Elaine N. Aron, Ph.D., is a psychotherapist, workshop leader, researcher, and highly sensitive person herself. She is the author of The Highly Sensitive Person, The Highly Sensitive Person in Love, and The Highly Sensitive Person’s Workbook. She divides her time between San Francisco and New York.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One

Sensitivity

A Better Light on "Shy" and "Fussy" Children

This chapter helps you decide if you have a highly sensitive child and explores the trait thoroughly. It also provides more knowledge about all of your child''s inherited temperament traits. Our goal will be to free you of any misconceptions you may have heard about sensitive children. Finally, we will distinguish high sensitivity from actual disorders (which it is not).

Well, if he were my child, he''d eat what was set before him."

"Your daughter is so quiet--have you considered seeing a doctor about that?"

"He is so mature, so wise for his age. But he seems to think too much. Don''t you worry that he isn''t more happy and carefree?

"Jodie''s feelings are so easily hurt. And she cries for other kids, too, when they are teased or hurt. And during the sad parts of stories. We don''t know what to do for her."

"In my kindergarten class, everyone participates in group time, but your son refuses. Is he this stubborn at home?"

Are these sorts of comments familiar to you? They are to the parents I interviewed for this book. They had heard all sorts of well-intentioned comments like these from in-laws, teachers, other parents, and even mental health professionals. If you''ve received such comments, it is almost surely a sign that you are the parent of a highly sensitive child (HSC). And, of course, they are troubling, because you''re hearing that something is odd or wrong with your child, yet you find your child marvelously aware, caring, and sensitive. Furthermore, you know that if you followed the well-intentioned advice, like forcing your child to eat foods he dislikes, socialize when he does not feel like it, or taking him to a psychiatrist, your child would suffer. On the other hand, if you follow the lead of your child, he thrives. Yet the comments keep coming, so you wonder if you''re a bad parent and if your child''s behavior is your fault. I have heard this same story over and over.

The Operating Manual for Your Child

No wonder you worry that you may be doing something wrong. You have no one to help you. You have probably noticed that most parenting books focus on "problem behaviors"--restlessness, distractibility, "wildness," and aggression. Your child is probably anything but a problem in these senses. You''re struggling with issues that the books don''t talk about so much--eating problems, shyness, nightmares, worrying, and intense emotions that are not directed so much at others as they are simply outbursts. The usual advice that you eliminate unwanted behaviors through "consequences" (punishment) often does not work--your child seems crushed by punishment or even criticism.

In this book you will receive advice, but only for sensitive children and from parents of sensitive children, myself included, plus specialists in this trait. And our first advice is not to believe people when they imply there is something wrong with your child, and do not let your child believe it either. Nor are your child''s differences your fault. Of course parenting can always be improved, and this book will "improve" you more than others, because, again, it is written entirely with your "different" child in mind. But forget the idea that the problem is some basic flaw in parent or child.

"Discovering" High Sensitivity

According to my own scientific research and professional experience as well as that of many others who have studied this trait under different, less accurate labels, your child has a normal variation in innate human temperament. She is one of the 15 to 20 percent born highly sensitive--far too many for them all to be "abnormal." Furthermore, the same percentage of sensitive individuals is found in every species that has been studied, as far as I know. With evolution behind it, there must be a good reason for the trait''s presence. We will get to that in a moment, but first, a little bit about this "discovery."

I began studying high sensitivity in 1991, after another psychologist commented to me that I was highly sensitive. I was curious personally, not planning to write a book or even to try to tell anyone about my findings. In my community and the university where I was teaching, I merely asked to interview people who were "highly sensitive to physical or emotionally evocative stimuli" or "highly introverted." At first I thought sensitivity might really be the same as introversion, which is the tendency to prefer to have one or two close friends with whom one can talk deeply, and not to be in large groups or meet strangers. Extroverts, on the other hand, like large gatherings, have many friends but usually talk less intimately with them, and enjoy meeting new people. It turned out that introversion was not the same as high sensitivity: Although 70 percent of highly sensitive people (HSP) are introverts, a tendency that is probably part of their strategy to reduce stimulation, 30 percent are extroverts. So I knew I had uncovered something new.

Why would a highly sensitive person be extroverted? According to my interviews, they were often raised in close, loving communities--in one case even a commune. For them, groups of people were familiar and meant safety. Others seemed to have been trained to be outgoing by their families--it was imperative, and as good HSPs they tried to do what was expected of them. One woman recalled the day and hour she decided to become an extrovert. She had lost her best and only friend and decided then and there not to depend anymore on having just one friend.

Since discovering that the trait of sensitivity is not the same as introversion, I have found other evidence that sensitive people are also not inherently shy or "neurotic"--that is, anxious and depressed. All of these descriptors are secondary, noninnate traits found in some sensitive people as well as in many who are not sensitive.

When I made my request to interview sensitive people, I was swamped with volunteers, and finally spoke individually with forty men and women of all ages and walks of life, for three hours each. They really wanted to talk about this--the term and why it meant so much to them the moment they heard it. (Many adults purchase The Highly Sensitive Person simply because they recognized themselves in the title, and likewise you may have bought this book because you recognized your child in its title.)

After discerning the many details of sensitivity from these interviews, I was able to create a long questionnaire about it, and later a shorter one (see pages 88-89), and have since given these to thousands of individuals. The 20 percent or so who are highly sensitive usually immediately grasp the concept as describing them. The nonsensitive 80 percent or so truly do not "get it" and some answer "no" to every item. I found the same results through a random phone survey. Sensitive people really are different.

Since then I have written and taught on the subject extensively, and soon saw the need for a book on raising highly sensitive children. There were too many sad stories from adults about their difficult childhoods, in which well-meaning parents caused tremendous pain because they did not know how to raise a sensitive child. So I interviewed parents and children, and from those talks developed a questionnaire that was given to over a hundred parents of all types of children. That survey, when honed down to the questions that best distinguish HSCs from non-HSCs, became the parent''s questionnaire at the end of the Introduction.

What Is High Sensitivity?

Highly sensitive individuals are those born with a tendency to notice more in their environment and deeply reflect on everything before acting, as compared to those who notice less and act quickly and impulsively. As a result, sensitive people, both children and adults, tend to be empathic, smart, intuitive, creative, careful, and conscientious (they are aware of the effects of a misdeed, and so are less likely to commit one). They are also more easily overwhelmed by "high volume" or large quantities of input arriving at once. They try to avoid this, and thus seem to be shy or timid or "party poopers." When they cannot avoid overstimulation, they seem "easily upset" and "too sensitive."

Although HSCs notice more, they do not necessarily have better eyes, ears, sense of smell, or taste buds--although some do report having at least one sense that is very keen. Mainly, their brains process information more thoroughly. This processing is not just in the brain, however, since highly sensitive people, children or adults, have faster reflexes (a reaction usually from the spinal cord); are more affected by pain, medications, and stimulants; and have more reactive immune systems and more allergies. In a sense, their entire body is designed to detect and understand more precisely whatever comes in.

How HSCs Sort Oranges

When I was little my father liked to take our family to visit factories, where he would talk the managers into taking us on a tour. The steel mills and glass manufacturers overwhelmed me, of course, because I was highly sensitive. They were too loud, hot, and fiery, and I would cry, so that I dreaded these trips. My nonsensitive family members, on the other hand, were annoyed by my tour-stopping behaviors. But I liked one tour--the orange-packing plant. I liked the ingenious invention that moved the oranges down a shaking conveyer belt until they fell into one of three sized slots--small, medium, or large.

I now use that experience as a way to describe the brains of HSCs. Instead of having three slots for processing what comes down the conveyer belt to them, they have fifteen slots, for making very fine distinctions. And all goes well until too many oranges come down the belt at once. Then you have a huge jam up.

So of course HSCs probably will not like the loud mariachi band in the Mexican restaurant, noisy birthday parties, playing fast-paced team sports, or everyone watching while they give an answer in class. But if you need a guitar tuned, a clever idea for party favors, a witty play on words, or to win a game like chess that requires anticipating consequences or noticing subtle differences, your HSC is the one to have around.

Is It All or None?

Can your child be just a little sensitive? Some researchers say you either have the trait or you do not; others say it is a continuum. My own research says both--that is, some HSCs seem more sensitive than others, probably because there are so many ways that a child''s environment can increase or decrease how much sensitivity is expressed. But if it were a true continuum, like height or weight, most people would be in the middle. In fact, the distribution of highly sensitive people is more like a flat line, perhaps even with a few more people at either end.

Inside the Highly Sensitive Child

Let''s go farther inside the mind of your HSC. Yes, he notices more, but he may have a "specialty." Some tune in to social cues, mainly noticing moods, expressions, or relationships. Some HSCs mainly notice the natural world, such as changes in the weather or the qualities of plants, or they seem to have an uncanny ability to communicate with animals. Some express subtle concepts, or the humorous and ironic. And some are mainly vigilant in new surroundings while others are mainly bothered by a change in the familiar. Still, in all cases, they are noticing more.

Your HSC is also thinking more than other kids about what she has noticed. Again, there is always variation. She may be pondering and asking you questions about social dilemmas--why you did what you did, why one kid teased another--or larger social issues. Another HSC might be trying to solve difficult math or logic puzzles, or worrying about "what would happen if," or making up stories or imagining their cat''s thoughts. All kids do these things, but HSCs do them more.

The HSCs'' reflecting on "what''s come in," particularly whatever they have seen or heard, may be quite conscious and obvious, as when they ask for more time to decide something. (You have probably noticed that trying to get an HSC to decide quickly is like trying to walk a male dog quickly past fire hydrants.) But often HSCs'' processing is entirely unconscious, as when they just intuitively sense what is going on with you. Indeed, intuition might be defined as knowing something without knowing how you know it, and sensitive people are generally highly intuitive.

The processing may be rapid, as when a child instantly knows "something''s up" or "you changed my sheets" when other children would not notice. Or it may be slow, as when HSCs think about something for hours, then announce some startling insight.

Finally, as a result of taking in more and processing it more completely, if the situation is creating an emotional response (and all situations do to some extent), your HSC is going to feel stronger emotions. Sometimes it''s intense love, awe, or joy. But because all children are dealing with new, stressful situations every day, HSCs will also have to feel fear, anger, and sadness, and feel these more intensely than other children.

Because of these strong feelings and deep thoughts, most HSCs are unusually empathic. So they suffer more when others suffer and become interested early in social justice. They are also brilliant interpreters of what is happening in anything or anyone that cannot speak--plants, animals, organs in bodies, babies, those not speaking the sensitive person''s language, and the very elderly when they suffer from dementia. They tend to have rich inner lives. And again, HSCs are conscientious for their age--they can imagine for themselves or understand when you say "what if everybody did that." They also tend to seek the meaning of their lives very early.

Mind you, HSCs are not saints. In particular, with a few bad experiences, they are more likely than others to become shy, fearful, or depressed. But with a little gentle guidance, they are exceptionally creative, cooperative, and kind--except when overwhelmed. And whatever they are doing--or not doing--HSCs do stand out, even though they are not "problems" in the usual sense.

Long before I knew I was raising a highly sensitive child, I just knew my son was "different." He was aware, incredibly creative, conscientious, cautious in new situations, easily hurt by his peers, not fond of "rough and tumble" play or sports, and emotionally intense. He was hard to raise in some ways, easy in others, and always stood out, even if only as the kid who was not joining in. So I developed the motto that I shared with you in the Introduction: If you want to have an exceptional child, you must be willing to have an exceptional child.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
1,192 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Ann Figs
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It tells you what a sensitive child is and how to handle them but it doesn''t address the core of the problem
Reviewed in the United States on July 30, 2018
Deals with the superficial. It tells you what a sensitive child is and how to handle them but it doesn''t address the core of the problem. Isolate the child when they are overly stimulated and accommodate to their personality. It is not a new concept in psychology! I don''t... See more
Deals with the superficial. It tells you what a sensitive child is and how to handle them but it doesn''t address the core of the problem. Isolate the child when they are overly stimulated and accommodate to their personality. It is not a new concept in psychology! I don''t like the author''s ideology.

I realize that the study of the neurology is a fairly new concept but there are other neurologist/psychiatrist/ psychologist in other countries trying to address the "sensitive child" differences. I would suggest looking also into other specialist globally. I might go into a slight tangent so if you want stop reading, stop here.
Please do read this book but don''t stop here. Look into communication difficulties not just to the fact that the child stops communicating when they are over stimulated. Why are they stimulated? Do they have an auditory disability? Do they have nonverbal communication problems? Is it a sensory integration problem? Do they have a slow brain processing speed? Is it a learning disability? ADHD? Dyspraxia?Do they have more than one of these problems?So again don''t stop here. As my own personal advocate and an advocate for my own child I felt inclined to share hopefully this helps.
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Jeannie
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Dr. Aron sheds light on the truth between sensitivity and shyness
Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2016
As an HSP myself, reading "The Highly Sensitive Child" offered invigorating insight into the mind and heart of my oldest daughter, who is also highly sensitive. For many years, she and I have butted heads over nearly everything, and after reading this book, I was... See more
As an HSP myself, reading "The Highly Sensitive Child" offered invigorating insight into the mind and heart of my oldest daughter, who is also highly sensitive. For many years, she and I have butted heads over nearly everything, and after reading this book, I was both humbled and empowered to reach her in a new way.

Dr. Elaine Aron''s practical tips in each chapter, particularly breaking down the developmental age groups, were refreshing, clear, and easy to implement. My husband and I have been discussing, at length, how we can foster our daughter''s gifts in a more meaningful way and reframe her sensitivity as neutral, rather than the perceived "bad" that the world defines it as.

My favorite aspect of the book included recognizing how highly sensitive children require lots of rest, breaks, and sleep; that they thrive within a routine and usually need help transitioning with life changes; how to help them cope with verbal or social aggression at school; and ways to facilitate conversation with older children or role play with younger ones. Our daughter was bullied in preschool, and my husband and I approached her teacher, to no avail. Had I read this book beforehand, I would have been able to offer concrete solutions on how to understand and help HSCs with the "teacher tips" at the end of the book.

Having read "The Highly Sensitive Person" before "The Highly Sensitive Child," I would "highly" recommend both books, especially if a parent suspects that his/her child may be highly sensitive, as well. Both together offer a full picture into understanding oneself and children who may have been labeled "shy" (which is situational), but who are actually just sensitive.

A great read for parents and teachers alike.
160 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wow, just wow
Reviewed in the United States on November 30, 2018
I bought this book to help my granddaughter, who is the spitting image of me. As I read, I was struck that not only is my granddaughter a highly sensitive child, she looks exactly like her grandmother who is finding out she is also the same. It explains so much to me and... See more
I bought this book to help my granddaughter, who is the spitting image of me. As I read, I was struck that not only is my granddaughter a highly sensitive child, she looks exactly like her grandmother who is finding out she is also the same. It explains so much to me and now I can see things clearer and I know why my granddaughter and I are so close. We understand each other. I also see my job as educating her very busy parents, who find some of her behavior bizarre and interpret her as being ''difficult'' or ''pretending''. It is our task to help raise her to not only cope with a wildly stimulating and often crude world, but to flourish at the same time. A worthy read.
43 people found this helpful
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Rebecca Tipton
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Amazing book. Life-changing for me.
Reviewed in the United States on January 26, 2020
I found this book, along the the author’s book The Highly Sensitive Person, to be life-changing. By far the most important self-help books I’ve ever come across. These books explain why my children and I (and others in my life) struggle with certain things, enjoy certain... See more
I found this book, along the the author’s book The Highly Sensitive Person, to be life-changing. By far the most important self-help books I’ve ever come across. These books explain why my children and I (and others in my life) struggle with certain things, enjoy certain things, and require certain things. Once I understood these concepts, embraced what that meant in my life and the lives of my kids, and began to apply the author’s suggestions, I felt like a new person - not flawed or inadequate, but whole, unique, and free to be exactly the person I was meant to be. Like a friend said, I now understand myself much better and realize why I am the way I am, without looking for excuses.

I found this series of books at a time when my toddler son was struggling at school and seemed overwhelmed by life. (Through tears) I did an Internet search for “can a child be too sensitive” and found these books. Wow.

I regularly pick up these books when I’m having a tough day, open to a random page, and am reminded of what being a highly sensitive person means. I share copies with anyone in my life - friends, other parents, medical and educational professionals - who I think can benefit from them. I recommend this book to anyone with a child who seems to have a more sensitive disposition than other kids. I really cannot say enough good things about it.
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T
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
From birth, my son has been very sensitive and ...
Reviewed in the United States on November 8, 2017
From birth, my son has been very sensitive and though I had no issue with this, I was constantly receiving unwanted advice/comments about his temperament from family members. This book has offered me insight on how to handle the critics!
35 people found this helpful
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J. J. Fung
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Change your perspective on how to guide your child through this world.
Reviewed in the United States on October 30, 2019
Having struggled with raising my little one, this book has really opened up my eyes and has some specific strategies and tips to help guide me through the process of raising a highly sensitive child. Our pediatrician first recommended The Difficult Child, but I feel that... See more
Having struggled with raising my little one, this book has really opened up my eyes and has some specific strategies and tips to help guide me through the process of raising a highly sensitive child. Our pediatrician first recommended The Difficult Child, but I feel that book is outdated and this one is more up to speed with new developments and findings in the last decade. If you are a highly sensitive person, chances are one of more of your kids will be highly sensitive as well. Do yourself a big service and read this. It''ll change your life and perspective on how to guide your child!
8 people found this helpful
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Katherine K
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A little more thorough would have been just perfect
Reviewed in the United States on January 27, 2018
There are many helpful concepts in this book. I now understand my daughter better and am hopefully a better parent for it. My only complaint is that I wish there were a more comprehensive section on school stress.
21 people found this helpful
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Madeline D
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
All that to say this book gives a lot of good insight and suggestions on how to help your child ...
Reviewed in the United States on May 3, 2017
If you are maybe questioning if you have a HSP child then buy this book. If you know you have an HSP child then definitely buy this book! It''s hard. It''s hard to understand where your child is coming from sometimes, hard to know what to do and I tend to be hard on myself.... See more
If you are maybe questioning if you have a HSP child then buy this book. If you know you have an HSP child then definitely buy this book! It''s hard. It''s hard to understand where your child is coming from sometimes, hard to know what to do and I tend to be hard on myself. All that to say this book gives a lot of good insight and suggestions on how to help your child in ways they will respond to.
19 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Mrs Duff
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
We now know much better what our little one is going through and what ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 8, 2018
This is the most helpful book I''ve bought in my life (I am a bookworm!). The relationships between my child, my partner and myself have been completely transformed since my partner and I read this book. We are really grateful to the author for writing such a thorough,...See more
This is the most helpful book I''ve bought in my life (I am a bookworm!). The relationships between my child, my partner and myself have been completely transformed since my partner and I read this book. We are really grateful to the author for writing such a thorough, accessible and practical book on this topic. We now know much better what our little one is going through and what we can do to help him. I have a 6 year old little boy who is extremely sensitive, felt like he''s much older. My partner and I are both highly sensitive but in very different ways. We reached a point that there were shouting, screaming, excessive worries and angers and tears in our house everyday and my boy was struggling to fit in at school. Since I read this book, my relationship with my little boy has been really smooth and sweet. My boy now calls me his best friend and he asked me whether Daddy could also read the book so to understand him better. He did and since then their relationship has also improved drastically.
35 people found this helpful
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JoM84
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Brilliant book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 5, 2019
Such an insightful and helpful book. I am myself highly sensitive amd had a feeling my 2 year old was too from her reactions to certain situations. This book is very reassuring and helpful, giving plenty of information as to what they are going through and how to support...See more
Such an insightful and helpful book. I am myself highly sensitive amd had a feeling my 2 year old was too from her reactions to certain situations. This book is very reassuring and helpful, giving plenty of information as to what they are going through and how to support them. I worry I hold her back sometimes as I am uncomfortable myself so this book is helping me to know when I should be giving her a nudge and when I''m right to hold back and support her. Definitely worth a read if you suspect your child is sensitive.
8 people found this helpful
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M E.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This book is amazing. I first read it when my daughter was ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 6, 2017
This book is amazing. I first read it when my daughter was two years old and I keep going back to it for sections now about older sensitive children. It has offered some fantastic insights into why she may behave in certain ways in certain situations. When I first read the...See more
This book is amazing. I first read it when my daughter was two years old and I keep going back to it for sections now about older sensitive children. It has offered some fantastic insights into why she may behave in certain ways in certain situations. When I first read the book it was like a breath of fresh air to read about other families with children who behaved the same way and it was amazingly supportive and helpful. If you are finding lots of frustrating situations it can be really helpful to understand what may be going on in your child''s mind (and I must admit it has helped me learn a bit about myself too!).
19 people found this helpful
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Nellie Dimirtova
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great and helpful book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 25, 2017
Another amazing book by Ms. Aron. I recommend it to all parents who think that their child might be sensitive - please, read this book to avoid all the mistakes my parents made when raising me and save yourselves and your child a lot of sleepless nights and arguments.
14 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Definitely worth buying!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 26, 2019
This book is so reassuring...when my child''s nursery made out there was something more serious wrong with my daughter, I became very concerned. Thank god this book exists, as it has fully explained to me all the ways in which my daughter can be sensitive & why she is...See more
This book is so reassuring...when my child''s nursery made out there was something more serious wrong with my daughter, I became very concerned. Thank god this book exists, as it has fully explained to me all the ways in which my daughter can be sensitive & why she is unsettled at her current over-crowded nursery.
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